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Garlic: Nature's Viagra

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Tuesday, September 16, 2008

This week we were watching an interesting program on the Discovery Health Channel about garlic and how its effect may be similar to how the body responds to the male enhancement drug Viagra. We watch this channel because it sometimes is an entertaining source of relevant health related information. All the same the topic for this episode was on the use of garlic in an attempt to improve the activity in the neither regions of a man using garlic. The scenario was that 8 middle age man suffering from erectile dysfunction would in conjunction with an exclusive fruit and vegetable diet; consume four cloves of garlic a day for 12 days.  I’m sure that you want to know what happen and we’ll get to that but first a little about how Viagra became so famous in short time.


A few years ago researcher at pharmaceutical giant Pfizer were trying to find a medication that would improve cardiovascular faction, decrease chest pain and decrease blood pressure. In one of those classic blunders that have given rise to some of the greatest medications (remember how penicillin was discovered), the drug that was invented was not that effective for what it was designed for but a side effect was increase blood flow to the male reproductive element.  The rest as they say is history but garlic may hold similar effect albeit less risk since it is naturally according.


Allium sativum L., or Garlic is in the onion family Alliaceae and according to research is one of nature most promising and readily available herbs.  According to the University of Maryland Medical website garlic is used to help prevent heart disease, including atherosclerosis (plaque buildup in the arteries that can block the flow of blood and possibly lead to heart attack or stroke), high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and to improve the immune system though the research is not definitive.  As many times impotence is associated with decrease blood flow, anything that increases this may decrease ED.  In a  study published in 2000 by the  US Department of health a Human service?, researched found that using garlic indicated some positive results in reducing the chance of cardiac complications however it did very little to decrease the level of what we might term bad cholesterol. 


Returning to the eight men, the results were that six out of the eight had noticeable activity and increase blood flow. Before you run out to the store and start warding off vampires, look at the other factor that was include in this experience. For twelve days, the guy consumed no fatty foods, coffee or anything that did not come directly from the ground to the table. This may indicated that garlic alone may not be the only thing one has to do to return life to your bedroom.  Eating healthy as just about any doctor will agree is the best way to extend the life of the entire body and this study validate this point.


The thing to take way from this information is that there may be a cure for ED in nature in your local grocery story but keep in mind that that nature works a little slower that many medication so I would not expect the same results as one can expect in artificially derived meds. Also since these gents consumed more garlic at one time that most of us, one can expect some side effect but from what I have investigated these are relatively mild lease of which is breath that may strip paint.  Keep an open mind and like anything, new consult with the old family doc to make sure that it safe for you.


When you are woofing down a heaping helping of Italian food have you ever considered how healthy a staple of italic cooking may actually be healthy? Garlic has other possible healing properties such as an antioxidant thereby decreasing your chance of developing certain types of cancer.   

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